CriterionCast Episodes – CriterionCast https://criterioncast.com Tue, 20 Oct 2020 06:05:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://criterioncast.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/cropped-9329A558-8143-4F71-9E79-E26F8C0F3C59-1-300x300.jpeg CriterionCast Episodes – CriterionCast https://criterioncast.com 32 32 Episode 211 – Chris Hegedus and D. A. Pennebaker’s The War Room https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-211-chris-hegedus-and-d-a-pennebakers-the-war-room Tue, 20 Oct 2020 11:59:47 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=64530

On episode 211 of CriterionCast, Jordan Essoe is joined by Scott Nye, David Blakeslee, and Arik Devens to discuss Chris Hegedus and D. A. Pennebaker’s 1993 film The War Room.

The 1992 presidential election was a triumph not only for Bill Clinton but also for the new breed of strategists who guided him to the White House—and changed the face of politics in the process.

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Episode 210 – Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’eclisse https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-210-michelangelo-antonionis-leclisse Wed, 16 Sep 2020 04:02:24 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=64310

On episode 210 of CriterionCast, Jordan Essoe is joined by Scott Nye, David Blakeslee, and Arik Devens to discuss Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1961 film L’eclisse.

Using the architecture of Rome as a backdrop for the doomed affair, Antonioni achieves the apotheosis of his style in this return to the theme that preoccupied him the most: the difficulty of connection in an alienating modern world.

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Episode 209 – Michelangelo Antonioni’s La notte https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-209-michelangelo-antonionis-la-notte Fri, 14 Aug 2020 04:55:12 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=64141

On episode 209 of CriterionCast, Jordan Essoe is joined by Scott Nye, David Blakeslee, and Arik Devens to discuss Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1961 film La notte.

Marcello Mastroianni and Jeanne Moreau star as a novelist and his frustrated wife, who, over the course of one night, confront their alienation from each other and the achingly empty bourgeois Milan circles in which they travel. Antonioni’s muse Monica Vitti smolders as an industrialist’s tempting daughter. Moodily sensual cinematography and subtly expressive performances make La notte an indelible illustration of romantic and social deterioration.

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Episode 208 – Michelangelo Antonioni’s L’avventura https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-208-michelangelo-antonionis-lavventura Fri, 10 Jul 2020 00:29:13 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=63929

On episode 208 of CriterionCast, Jordan Essoe is joined by Scott Nye, David Blakeslee, and Arik Devens to discuss Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1960 film L’avventura.

Michelangelo Antonioni invented a new film grammar with this masterwork. An iconic piece of challenging 1960s cinema and a gripping narrative on its own terms, L’avventura concerns the enigmatic disappearance of a young woman during a yachting trip off the coast of Sicily, and the search taken up by her disaffected lover (Gabriele Ferzetti) and best friend (Monica Vitti, in her breakout role).

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Episode 207 – Roberto Rossellini’s Germany Year Zero https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-207-roberto-rossellinis-germany-year-zero Wed, 10 Jun 2020 11:59:14 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=63782

This time on the podcast, Jordan Essoe, Scott Nye, David Blakeslee, and Arik Devens discuss Roberto Rossellini’s Germany Year Zero.

The concluding chapter of Roberto Rossellini’s War Trilogy is the most devastating, a portrait of an obliterated Berlin, seen through the eyes of a twelve-year-old boy.

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Episode 206 – Roberto Rossellini’s Paisan https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-206-roberto-rossellinis-paisan Sat, 16 May 2020 11:59:24 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=63666

This time on the podcast, Jordan Essoe, Scott Nye, David Blakeslee, and Arik Devens discuss Roberto Rossellini’s Paisan.

With its documentary-like visuals and intermingled cast of actors and nonprofessionals, Italians and their American liberators, this look at the struggles of different cultures to communicate and of people to live their everyday lives in extreme circumstances is equal parts charming sentiment and vivid reality.

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Episode 205 – Roberto Rossellini’s Rome, Open City https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-205-roberto-rossellinis-rome-open-city Fri, 08 May 2020 23:44:39 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=63646

This time on the podcast, Jordan Essoe, Scott Nye, David Blakeslee, and Arik Devens discuss Roberto Rossellini’s Rome Open City.

This was Roberto Rossellini’s revelation, a harrowing drama about the Nazi occupation of Rome and the brave few who struggled against it. Though told with more melodramatic flair than the films that would follow it to form The War Trilogy and starring some well-known actors—Aldo Fabrizi as a priest helping the partisan cause and Anna Magnani in her breakthrough role as the fiancée of a resistance member—Rome Open City is a shockingly authentic experience, conceived and directed amid the ruin of World War II, with immediacy in every frame. Marking a watershed moment in Italian cinema, this galvanic work garnered awards around the globe and left the beginnings of a new film movement in its wake.

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Episode 204 – Wacky 2020! https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-204-wacky-2020 Wed, 01 Jan 2020 23:59:34 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=63082

Ryan is joined by David and Aaron to chat about the Wacky New Year’s Drawing for 2020.

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Episode 203 – Criterion Collection Favorites of 2019 https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-203-criterion-collection-favorites-of-2019 Tue, 31 Dec 2019 22:59:49 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=63075

To celebrate The Criterion Collection’s 2019 releases – and there’s a lot to celebrate – Ryan Gallagher, David Blakeslee, Scott Nye, Trevor Berrett, and Jordan Essoe gather to talk about the past year in Criterion, including their favorite three Criterion releases of 2019.

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Episode Notes

Ryan’s List

David’s List

Scott’s List

Trevor’s List

Jordan’s List

Miscellaneous Links

Episode Credits

Past Favorites of the Year Episodes

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Episode 202 – William Wyler’s The Heiress https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-202-the-heiress Thu, 29 Aug 2019 00:00:02 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=61734

This time on the podcast, Trevor Berrett, Scott Nye, and David Blakeslee discuss William Wyler’s The Heiress.

Directed with a keen sense of ambiguity by William Wyler, this film based on a hit stage adaptation of Henry James’s Washington Square pivots on a question of motive. When shy, emotionally fragile Catherine Sloper (Olivia de Havilland, in a heartbreaking, Oscar-winning turn), the daughter of a wealthy New York doctor, begins to receive calls from the handsome spendthrift Morris Townsend (Montgomery Clift), she becomes possessed by the promise of romance. Are his smoldering professions of love sincere, as she believes they are? Or is Catherine’s calculating father (Ralph Richardson) correct in judging Morris a venal fortune seeker? A graceful drawing-room drama boasting Academy Award–winning costume design by Edith Head, The Heiress is also a piercing character study riven by emotional uncertainty and lacerating cruelty, in a triumph of classic Hollywood filmmaking at its most psychologically nuanced.

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Episode 201 – Ten Years! https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-201-ten-years Sun, 07 Jul 2019 00:40:51 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=61500

To celebrate the ten-year anniversary of the first episode of the podcast going live (on July 6th, 2009), Ryan is joined by Arik Devens, David Blakeslee, Josh Brunsting, and Scott Nye to talk about the anniversary.

They also get into their own thoughts on the theories surrounding the upcoming 1000th spine number, how the Criterion Channel is faring so far, and the Studio Canal titles coming back into print.

Thanks for all of the support over the past decade!

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Episode 200 – Ingmar Bergman’s The Silence https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-200-ingmar-bergmans-the-silence Sun, 21 Apr 2019 16:36:03 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=61110

This time on the podcast, Scott Nye, David Blakeslee, Trevor Berrett, and Arik Devens discuss Ingmar Bergman’s The Silence.

Two sisters—the sickly, intellectual Ester (Ingrid Thulin) and the sensual, pragmatic Anna (Gunnel Lindblom)—travel by train with Anna’s young son, Johan (Jörgen Lindström), to a foreign country that appears to be on the brink of war. Attempting to cope with their alien surroundings, each sister is left to her own vices while they vie for Johan’s affection, and in so doing sabotage what little remains of their relationship. Regarded as one of the most sexually provocative films of its day, Ingmar Bergman’s The Silence offers a disturbing vision of emotional isolation in a suffocating spiritual void.

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Episode 199 – Ingmar Bergman’s Winter Light https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-199-ingmar-bergmans-winter-light Sun, 21 Apr 2019 16:35:51 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=61107

This time on the podcast, Scott Nye, David Blakeslee, Trevor Berrett, and Arik Devens discuss Ingmar Bergman’s Winter Light.

“God, why hast thou forsaken me?” With Winter Light, Ingmar Bergman explores the search for redemption in a meaningless existence. Small-town pastor Tomas Ericsson (Gunnar Björnstrand) performs his duties mechanically before a dwindling congregation, including his stubbornly devoted lover, Märta (Ingrid Thulin). When he is asked to assuage a troubled parishioner’s (Max von Sydow) debilitating fear of nuclear annihilation, Tomas is terrified to find that he can provide nothing but his own doubt. The beautifully photographed Winter Light is an unsettling look at the human craving for personal validation in a world seemingly abandoned by God.

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Episode 198 – A Conversation About DIANE, with Director Kent Jones https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-198-a-conversation-about-diane-with-director-kent-jones Sat, 23 Mar 2019 19:00:19 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=60939

In this episode, David Blakeslee interviews director and film critic Kent Jones, a frequent contributor to the essays published by the Criterion Collection. His new film Diane, starring Mary Kay Place, won prizes at Tribeca and Locarno, and earned nominations at numerous festival showings in 2018. Diane is now set to open in theaters across the USA over the next several weeks. Here’s the synopsis from the film’s press kit:

For Diane (Mary Kay Place), everyone else comes first. Generous but with little patience for self-pity, she spends her days checking in on sick friends, volunteering at her local soup kitchen, and trying valiantly to save her troubled, drug-addicted adult son (Jake Lacy) from himself. But beneath her relentless routine of self-sacrifice, Diane is fighting a desperate internal battle, haunted by a past she can’t forget and which threatens to tear her increasingly chaotic world apart. Built around an extraordinary, fearless performance from Mary Kay Place, the narrative debut from Kent Jones is a profound, beautifully human portrait of a woman rifling through the wreckage of her life in search of redemption.

Kent Jones

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Episode 197 – Ingmar Bergman’s Through a Glass Darkly https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-197-ingmar-bergmans-through-a-glass-darkly Thu, 21 Feb 2019 05:59:25 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=60807

This time on the podcast, Scott Nye, David Blakeslee, Trevor Berrett, and Arik Devens discuss Ingmar Bergman’s Through a Glass Darkly.

While vacationing on a remote island retreat, a family’s fragile ties are tested when daughter Karin (an astonishing Harriet Andersson) discovers her father (Gunnar Björnstrand) has been using her schizophrenia for his own literary ends. As she drifts in and out of lucidity, Karin’s father, her husband (Max von Sydow), and her younger brother (Lars Passgård) are unable to prevent her descent into the abyss of mental illness. Winner of the Academy Award for best foreign-language film, Through a Glass Darkly, the first work in Ingmar Bergman’s trilogy on faith and its loss (to be followed by Winter Light and The Silence), presents an unflinching vision of a family’s near disintegration and a tortured psyche further taunted by the intangibility of God’s presence.

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Episode 196 – Wacky 2019! https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-196-wacky-2019 Fri, 04 Jan 2019 12:59:24 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=60546

Ryan and David chat about the Wacky New Year’s Drawing for 2019.

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Past Wacky New Year’s Episodes

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Episode 195 – Criterion Collection Favorites of 2018 https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-195-criterion-collection-favorites-of-2018 Thu, 27 Dec 2018 12:59:43 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=60455

To celebrate The Criterion Collection’s 2018 releases – and there’s a lot to celebrate – Ryan Gallagher, Arik Devens, David Blakeslee, and Jordan Essoe gather to talk about the past year in Criterion, including their favorite three Criterion releases of 2018.

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Episode Notes

Ryan’s List

David’s List

Arik’s List

Jordan’s List

Miscellaneous Links

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Past Favorites of the Year Episodes

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Episode 194 — Ingmar Bergman’s Persona https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/151-200/episode-194-persona Fri, 07 Dec 2018 13:00:34 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=60392  

This time on the podcast, Scott Nye, David Blakeslee, and Trevor Berrett discuss Ingmar Bergman’s Persona.

By the midsixties, Ingmar Bergman had already conjured many of the cinema’s most unforgettable images. But with the radical Persona, he attained new levels of visual poetry. In the first of a series of legendary performances for Bergman, Liv Ullmann plays a stage actor who has inexplicably gone mute; an equally mesmerizing Bibi Andersson is the garrulous young nurse caring for her in a remote island cottage. While isolated together there, the women undergo a mysterious spiritual and emotional transference. Performed with astonishing nuance and shot in stark contrast and soft light by Sven Nykvist, the influential Persona is a penetrating, dreamlike work of profound psychological depth.

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Episode 193 – Jacques Demy’s The Umbrellas of Cherbourg https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/151-200/episode-193-jacques-demys-the-umbrellas-of-cherbourg Wed, 06 Jun 2018 13:30:24 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=59110

In this episode, Trevor Berrett, David Blakeslee and Scott Nye discuss Jacques Demy’s The Umbrellas of Cherbourg.

The angelically beautiful Catherine Deneuve was launched to stardom by this dazzling musical heart-tugger from Jacques Demy. She plays an umbrella-shop owner’s delicate daughter, glowing with first love for a handsome garage mechanic, played by Nino Castelnuovo. When the boy is shipped off to fight in Algeria, the two lovers must grow up quickly. Exquisitely designed in a kaleidoscope of colors, and told entirely through lilting songs by the great composer Michel Legrand, The Umbrellas of Cherbourg is one of the most revered and unorthodox movie musicals of all time.

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Episode 192 – 100 Years of Olympic Films [Winter Games Edition] https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/151-200/episode-192-100-years-of-olympic-films-winter-games-edition Tue, 20 Feb 2018 13:00:00 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=58429

In this episode, David Blakeslee, Arik Devens and Aaron West take a break from watching live coverage of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Peongchyang to talk about some of their favorite images from past Winter Games, as captured in the Criterion Collection’s massive release from late 2017, 100 Years of Olympic Films 1912-2012.

Spanning fifty-three movies and forty-one editions of the Olympic Games, 100 Years of Olympic Films: 1912–2012 is the culmination of a monumental, award-winning archival project encompassing dozens of new restorations by the International Olympic Committee. The documentaries collected here cast a cinematic eye on some of the most iconic moments in the history of modern sports, spotlighting athletes who embody the Olympic motto of “Faster, Higher, Stronger”: Jesse Owens shattering world records on the track in 1936 Berlin, Jean-Claude Killy dominating the Grenoble slopes in 1968, Joan Benoit breaking away to win the Games’ first women’s marathon in Los Angeles in 1984. In addition to the impressive ten-feature contribution of Bud Greenspan, this stirring collective chronicle of triumph and defeat includes such documentary landmarks as Leni Riefenstahl’s Olympia and Kon Ichikawa’s Tokyo Olympiad, along with captivating lesser-known works by major directors like Claude Lelouch, Carlos Saura, and Miloš Forman. It also offers a fascinating glimpse of the development of film itself, and of the technological progress that has brought viewers ever closer to the action. Traversing continents and decades, reflecting the social, cultural, and political changes that have shaped our recent history, this remarkable movie marathon showcases a hundred years of human endeavor.

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PURCHASE THE SET

100 YEARS OF OLYMPIC FILMS 1912 -2012


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Arik’s Reviews of Individual Films:

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Episode 191 – John Ford’s Young Mr. Lincoln https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/151-200/ep-191-young-mr-lincoln Mon, 19 Feb 2018 13:00:07 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=58417

In this episode, David Blakeslee, Scott Nye and Trevor Berrett discuss John Ford’s Young Mr. Lincoln, recently reissued by the Criterion Collection in a newly upgraded 4K restoration on Blu-ray and DVD.

Few American historical figures are as revered as Abraham Lincoln, and few director-star collaborations embody classic Hollywood cinema as beautifully as the one between John Ford and Henry Fonda. This film, their first together, was Ford’s equally poetic and significant follow-up to the groundbreaking western Stagecoach, and in it Fonda gives one of the finest performances of his career, as the young president-to-be, a novice lawyer struggling with an incendiary murder case. Photographed in gorgeous black and white by Ford’s frequent collaborator Bert Glennon, Young Mr. Lincoln is a compassionate and assured work and an indelible piece of Americana.

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HENRY FONDA ON YOUNG MR. LINCOLN


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Episode 190 – New Year’s Wacky Drawing 2017-18 https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/151-200/episode-190-new-years-wacky-drawing-2017-18 https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/151-200/episode-190-new-years-wacky-drawing-2017-18#comments Sun, 31 Dec 2017 19:30:20 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=57812

Hot off the press, David Blakeslee and Aaron West get together to dissect the clues provided by the Criterion Collection’s annual Wacky Drawing hinting at upcoming releases for 2018.

Follow along with our conversation by referencing the alphabet-coded breakdown of this year’s illustration by Jason Polan.

Links to past analyses:

Here are links to the various drawings from the past few years

 

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Episode 189 – Criterion Collection Favorites of 2017 https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/151-200/episode-189-favorites-of-2017 Thu, 21 Dec 2017 13:00:43 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=57632

To celebrate The Criterion Collection’s 2017 releases – and there’s a lot to celebrate – Aaron West, Arik Devens, David Blakeslee, Jordan Essoe, Scott Nye and Trevor Berrett gather to talk about the past year in Criterion, including their favorite three Criterion releases of 2017.

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Episode Notes

Jordan’s List

Arik’s List

Aaron’s List

Trevor’s List

Scott’s List

David’s List

Episode Credits

Past Favorites of the Year Episodes

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Episode 188 – Monte Hellman’s The Shooting & Ride in the Whirlwind https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/151-200/episode-188-monte-hellmans-the-shooting-ride-in-the-whirlwind Mon, 11 Dec 2017 22:05:09 +0000 https://criterioncast.com/?p=57561

This time on the podcast, Scott is joined by David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett to discuss Monte Hellman’s The Shooting and Ride in the Whirlwind.

In the midsixties, the maverick American director Monte Hellman conceived of two westerns at the same time. Dreamlike and gritty by turns, these films would prove their maker’s adeptness at brilliantly deconstructing genre. Shot back-to-back for famed producer Roger Corman, they feature overlapping casts and crews, including Jack Nicholson in two of his meatiest early roles. The Shooting, about a motley assortment of loners following a mysterious wanted man through a desolate frontier, and Ride in the Whirlwind, about a group of cowhands pursued by vigilantes for crimes they did not commit, are rigorous, artful, and wholly unconventional journeys to the Old West.

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Purchase the Film

Roger Corman and Monte Hellman discuss the films


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Episode 187 – Jack Clayton’s The Innocents https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/151-200/episode-187-jack-claytons-the-innocents Wed, 25 Oct 2017 12:00:17 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=56829

This time on the podcast, Trevor Berrett, David Blakeslee, and Scott Nye discuss Jack Clayton’s The Innocents.

This genuinely frightening, exquisitely made supernatural gothic stars Deborah Kerr as an emotionally fragile governess who comes to suspect that there is something very, very wrong with her precocious new charges. A psychosexually intensified adaptation of Henry James’s classic The Turn of the Screw, cowritten by Truman Capote and directed by Jack Clayton, The Innocents is a triumph of narrative economy and technical expressiveness, from its chilling sound design to the stygian depths of its widescreen cinematography by Freddie Francis.

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Episode 186 – Yasujiro Ozu’s An Autumn Afternoon https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-186-an-autumn-afternoon Tue, 05 Sep 2017 13:00:35 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=56331

In this episode, David Blakeslee, Trevor Berrett and Matt Gasteier provide a conclusion to their conversations about “Late Ozu”, carried over from the final three episodes of The Eclipse Viewer podcast. They’re also joined by Scott Nye.

About the film:

The last film by Yasujiro Ozu was also his final masterpiece, a gently heartbreaking story about a man’s dignifed resignation to life’s shifting currents and society’s modernization. Though the widower Shuhei (frequent Ozu leading man Chishu Ryu) has been living comfortably for years with his grown daughter, a series of events leads him to accept and encourage her marriage and departure from their home. As elegantly composed and achingly tender as any of the Japanese master’s films, An Autumn Afternoon is one of cinema’s fondest farewells.

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Episode 185 – Andrei Tarkovsky’s Stalker https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-185-andrei-tarkovskys-stalker Mon, 24 Jul 2017 21:57:36 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=56173

This time on the podcast, Trevor Berrett and Scott Nye discuss Andrei Tarkovsky’s Stalker.

Andrei Tarkovsky’s final Soviet feature is a metaphys­ical journey through an enigmatic postapocalyptic landscape, and a rarefied cinematic experience like no other. A hired guide—the Stalker—leads a writer and a professor into the heart of the Zone, the restricted site of a long-ago disaster, where the three men eventually zero in on the Room, a place rumored to fulfill one’s most deeply held desires. Adapting a science-fiction novel by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky, Tarkovsky created an immersive world with a wealth of material detail and a sense of organic atmosphere. A religious allegory, a reflection of contemporaneous political anxieties, a meditation on film itself—Stalkerenvelops the viewer by opening up a multitude of possible meanings.

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Episode Links

Episode Credits

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Episode 184 – Mark Robson’s Valley of the Dolls https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-184-valley-of-the-dolls Sat, 15 Jul 2017 18:30:09 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=56047

This time on the podcast, David Blakeslee and Catherine Stebbins discuss the 1967 Hollywood blockbuster Valley of the Dolls.

Cutthroat careerism, wild sex, and fierce female protagonists are all on offer in this adaptation of Jacqueline Susann’s sensational and wildly popular novel. Patty Duke, Barbara Parkins, and Sharon Tate star as three friends attempting to navigate the glamorous, pressurized world of big-time show business—the “valley” is not a place but a narcotized state of mind, and the “dolls” are the pills that rouse them in the morning and knock them out at night. Blending old-fashioned gloss with Madison Avenue grooviness, director Mark Robson’s slick look at the early days of sexual liberation and an entertainment industry coming apart was a giant box-office hit, and has become an unforgettably campy time capsule of the 1960s.

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Episode 183 – Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-Up https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-183-michelangelo-antonionis-blow-up Fri, 23 Jun 2017 13:00:28 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=55923

This time on the podcast, Scott Nye, David Blakeslee, and Trevor Berrett discuss Michelangelo Antonioni’s Blow-Up.

In 1966, Michelangelo Antonioni transplanted his existentialist ennui to the streets of swinging London for this international sensation, the Italian filmmaker’s first English-language feature. A countercultural masterpiece about the act of seeing and the art of image making, Blow-Up takes the form of a psychological mystery, starring David Hemmings as a fashion photographer who unknowingly captures a death on film after following two lovers in a park. Antonioni’s meticulous aesthetic control and intoxicating color palette breathe life into every frame, and the jazzy sounds of Herbie Hancock, a beautifully evasive performance by Vanessa Redgrave, and a cameo by the Yardbirds make the film a transporting time capsule from a bygone era. Blow-Up is a seductive immersion into creative passion, and a brilliant film by one of cinema’s greatest artists.

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Episode Links

Episode Credits

[amazon_link asins=’B01MSZLUQ6,B01MZ0BP6D’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’criter-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’4ecebdce-5763-11e7-b424-45e6dc10790f’] ]]>
Episode 182 – George Stevens’ Woman of the Year https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-182-woman-of-the-year Tue, 09 May 2017 12:00:50 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=55667

This time on the podcast, David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett discuss George Stevens’s Woman of the Year.

George Stevens’s Woman of the Year, conceived to build on the smashing comeback Katharine Hepburn had made in The Philadelphia Story, marked the beginning of the personal and professional union between Hepburn and Spencer Tracy, who would go on to make eight more films together. This tale of two newspaper reporters who wed and then discover that their careers aren’t so compatible forges a fresh and realistic vision of what marriage can be. The freewheeling but pinpoint-sharp screenplay by Ring Lardner Jr. and Michael Kanin won an Academy Award, and Hepburn received a nomination for her performance. Woman of the Year is a dazzling, funny, and rueful observation of what it takes for men and women to get along—both in the workplace and outside of it.

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Episode Links

Episode Credits

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Episode 181 – Peter Weir’s Picnic at Hanging Rock https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-181-peter-weirs-picnic-at-hanging-rock Sun, 26 Feb 2017 13:00:20 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=55170

This time on the podcast, Trevor Berrett and David Blakeslee discuss Peter Weir’s Picnic at Hanging Rock.

This sensual and striking chronicle of a disappearance and its aftermath put director Peter Weir on the map and helped usher in a new era of Australian cinema. Based on an acclaimed 1967 novel by Joan Lindsay, Picnic at Hanging Rock is set at the turn of the twentieth century and concerns a small group of students from an all- female college who vanish, along with a chaperone, while on a St. Valentine’s Day outing. Less a mystery than a journey into the mystic, as well as an inquiry into issues of class and sexual repression in Australian society, Weir’s gorgeous, disquieting film is a work of poetic horror whose secrets haunt viewers to this day.

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Episode Links

Episode Credits

[amazon_link asins=’B00J2PQZBC,B00JPUUSOO’ template=’ProductCarousel2′ store=’criter-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’4b0b7af4-fbb3-11e6-9b55-3dd48436138c’] ]]>
Episode 180 – Criterion Collection Favorites of 2016 https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/ep-180-favorites-of-2016 Wed, 18 Jan 2017 13:00:41 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=54928

To celebrate The Criterion Collection’s 2016 releases — and there’s a lot to celebrate — Arik Devens, David Blakeslee, Keith Enright, Scott Nye, and Trevor Berrett gather to talk about the past year in Criterion, including their favorite three Criterion releases of 2016.

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Episode Notes

Arik’s List

– Favorite Cover: A Brighter Summer Day
– Favorite Packaging: Trilogia de Guillermo del Toro
– Favorite Releases:
3) Fantastic Planet
2) Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy
1) Night and Fog

David’s List

– Favorite Cover: Lady Snowblood
– Favorite Packaging: Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
– Favorite Releases:
3) The Executioner/Death by Hanging
2) Chimes at Midnight
1) The Emigrants/The New Land

Keith’s List

– Favorite Cover: Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams
– Favorite Packaging: Valley and Beyond the Valley
– Favorite Releases:
3) Valley of the Dolls and Beyond the Valley
2) One-Eyed Jacks
1) The Kennedy Films of Robert Drew & Associates

Scott’s List

– Favorite Cover: The Emigrants/The New Land
– Favorite Packaging: Wim Wenders: The Road Trilogy
– Favorite Releases:
3) Paris Belongs to Us
2) Chimes at Midnight
1) A Brighter Summer Day

Trevor’s List

– Favorite Cover: La chienne
– Favorite Packaging: Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
– Favorite Releases:
3) I Knew Her Well
2) Dekalog
1) Gilda

Episode Credits

Past Favorites of the Year Episodes

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Episode 179 – Criterion Collection Wish List for 2017 https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-179-wish-list-2017 https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-179-wish-list-2017#comments Fri, 30 Dec 2016 19:00:28 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=54690

Episode Links

Past Wish List Episodes

DVD to BluRay Wish Lists

Aaron:

  1. The Shop on Main Street
  2. Pickup on South Street

Arik:

  1. Cleo from 5 to 7
  2. Berlin Alexanderplatz

Mark:

  1. Taste of Cherry
  2. Sisters

David:

  1. Do the Right Thing
  2. Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters

LD to Blu-Ray Wish Lists

Aaron:

  1. Blue Velvet (Announced as LD Spine #219 but never released)
  2. Early Hitchcock Box (Sabotage, The Secret Agent, Young and Innocent, The Lodger, The Man Who Knew Too Much)

Arik:

  1. A Night at the Opera
  2. Singin’ in the Rain

Mark:

  1. 2001: A Space Odyssey
  2. The Producers

David:

  1. I Am Cuba
  2. Letter From an Unknown Woman

FilmStruck-to-Criterion Disc Wish Lists

Aaron:

  1. Come and See
  2. The Passenger

Arik:

  1. Nanook of the North
  2. Pygmalion

Mark:

  1. Stalker
  2. Flight of The Red Balloon (Not currently available on FilmStruck)
  3. The Big Red One

David:

  1. Shame
  2. The 47 Ronin, Parts 1 and Part 2

Box Set Breakouts Wish Lists

Aaron:

  1. Lacombe, Lucien

Arik:

  1. Phantom India

Mark:

  1. The Last Picture Show

David:

  1. Ashes and Diamonds
  2. Samurai Rebellion

OOP Rescue Wish Lists

Aaron:

  1. Tokyo Olympiad
  2. Army of Shadows

Arik:

  1. A Woman is a Woman
  2. Ran

Mark:

  1. Alphaville
  2. Nights of Cabiria

David:

  1. The Harder They Come
  2. The Fireman’s Ball

Wish List for Criterion 4K UHD Upgrades

Here’s a list of currently available CC 4K transfers

Aaron:

  1. A Brighter Summer Day
  2. Koyaanisqatsi

Arik:

  1. Valerie and Her Week of Wonders

Mark:

  1. Mulholland Drive Eraserhead
  2. On The Waterfront

David:

  1. The New World
  2. The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou

Episode Credits


Music for the show is from Fatboy Roberts’ Geek Remixed project.

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Episode 178 – Fritz Lang’s The Testament of Dr. Mabuse https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-178-fritz-langs-the-testament-of-dr-mabuse Tue, 08 Nov 2016 13:00:39 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=54378 testament_mabuse_header

This time on the podcast, Ryan is joined by Arik Devens to discuss Fritz Lang’s The Testament of Dr. Mabuse.

Locked away in an asylum for a decade and teetering between life and death, the criminal mastermind Doctor Mabuse (Rudolf Klein-Rogge) has scribbled his last will and testament: a manifesto establishing a future empire of crime. When the document’s nefarious writings start leading to terrifying parallels in reality, it’s up to Berlin’s star detective, Inspector Lohmann (Otto Wernicke, reprising his role from M) to connect the most fragmented, maddening clues in a case unlike any other.

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Purchase the Film

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Episode Links

Episode Credits


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Episode 177 – Georges Franju’s Eyes Without a Face https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-177-eyes-without-a-face Thu, 27 Oct 2016 12:00:31 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=54268 eyeswithout_header

This time on the podcast, Ryan is joined by West Anthony to discuss George Franju’s Eyes Without a Face.

At his secluded chateau in the French countryside, a brilliant, obsessive doctor (Pierre Brasseur) attempts a radical plastic surgery to restore the beauty of his daughter’s disfigured countenance—at a horrifying price.

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Purchase the Film

260_bd_box_348x490_original

260_box_348x490_original

Trailer


Episode Links

Episode Credits

Links to West online


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Episode 176 – Kenji Mizoguchi’s The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-176-chrysanthemum Sat, 15 Oct 2016 19:57:33 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=54155 chrysanthemum_header_1200

This time on the podcast, Scott is joined by David Blakeslee and Ryan Gallagher to discuss Kenji Mizoguchi’s The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum.

This heartrending masterpiece by Kenji Mizoguchi about the give-and-take between life and art marked the first full realization of the hypnotic long takes and eloquent camera movements that would come to define the director’s films. Kikunosuke (Shotaro Hanayagi), the adopted son of a legendary kabuki actor who is striving to achieve stardom by mastering female roles, turns to his infant brother’s wet nurse for support and affection—and she soon gives up everything for her beloved’s creative glory. Offering a fascinating glimpse behind the scenes of kabuki theater in the late nineteenth century, The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum provides a critique of the oppression of women and the sacrifices required of them, and represents the pinnacle of Mizoguchi’s early career.

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Purchase the Film

chrysanthemum_blu

chrysanthemum_dvd

Scene


Episode Links

Episode Credits


Music from this episode is by Simon & Garfunkel.

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Episode 175 – Ingmar Bergman’s Smiles of a Summer Night https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-175-ingmar-bergmans-smiles-of-a-summer-night Mon, 29 Aug 2016 12:00:11 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=53857 Smile_header1

This time on the podcast, Scott is joined by David Blakeslee, Trevor Berrett, and Arik Devens to discuss Ingmar Bergman’s Smiles of a Summer Night.

About the film:

After fifteen films that received mostly local acclaim, the 1955 comedy Smiles of a Summer Night (Sommarnattens leende) at last ushered in an international audience for Ingmar Bergman. In turn-of-the-century Sweden, four men and four women attempt to navigate the laws of attraction. During a weekend in the country, the women collude to force the men’s hands in matters of the heart, exposing their pretensions and insecurities along the way. Chock-full of flirtatious propositions and sharp witticisms delivered by such Swedish screen legends as Gunnar Björnstrand and Harriet Andersson, Smiles of a Summer Night is one of cinema’s great erotic comedies.

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Buy The Film On Amazon:

Smiles_Blu

Smiles_DVD

Watch a scene from the film:


Episode Links:

Episode Credits:


Music from this episode is by John Travolta & Olivia Newton-John and Robbie Williams.

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Episode 174 – Ingmar Bergman’s Summer with Monika https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-174-ingmar-bergmans-summer-with-monika Mon, 25 Jul 2016 12:00:29 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=53648 monikadvd_big1a

This time on the podcast, Scott is joined by David Blakeslee, Trevor Berrett, and Arik Devens to discuss Ingmar Bergman’s Summer with Monika.

About the film:

Inspired by the earthy eroticism of Harriet Andersson, in the first of her many roles for him, Ingmar Bergman had a major international breakthrough with this sensual and ultimately ravaging tale of young love. A girl (Andersson) and boy (Lars Ekborg) from working-class families in Stockholm run away from home to spend a secluded, romantic summer at the beach, far from parents and responsibilities. Inevitably, it is not long before the pair are forced to return to reality. The version initially released in the U.S. was reedited by its distributor into something more salacious, but the original Summer with Monika (Sommaren med Monika), presented here, is a work of stunning maturity and one of Bergman’s most important films.

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Buy The Film On Amazon:

monikablu

monikadvd

Watch the sensationalistic trailer for the original U.S. release:


Episode Links:

Episode Credits:


Music from this episode is by The Beach Boys.

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Episode 173 – Ingmar Bergman’s Summer Interlude https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-173-ingmar-bergmans-summer-interlude Sat, 25 Jun 2016 12:00:23 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=53398 summerinterlude_big1b

This time on the podcast, Scott is joined by David Blakeslee, Trevor Berrett, and Arik Devens to discuss Ingmar Bergman’s Summer Interlude.

About the film:

Touching on many of the themes that would define the rest of his legendary career—isolation, performance, the inescapability of the past—Ingmar Bergman’s tenth film was a gentle drift toward true mastery. In one of the director’s great early female roles, Maj-Britt Nilsson beguiles as an accomplished ballet dancer haunted by her tragic youthful affair with a shy, handsome student (Birger Malmsten). Her memories of the sunny, rocky shores of Stockholm’s outer archipelago mingle with scenes from her gloomy present, most of them set in the dark backstage environs of the theater where she works. A film that the director considered a creative turning point, Summer Interlude (Sommarlek) is a reverie about life and death that unites Bergman’s love of theater and cinema.

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Buy The Film On Amazon:

summerinterludeblu

summerinterludedvd

Watch the trailer:


Episode Links:

Episode Credits:


Music from this episode is by Chad & Jeremy and Sam Cooke.

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Episode 172 – Michael Bay’s Armageddon https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-172-michael-bays-armageddon Sat, 04 Jun 2016 12:00:28 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=53111 Armageddon1200

This time on the podcast, Scott is joined by David Blakeslee, Ryan Gallagher, and James McCormick to discuss Michael Bay’s Armageddon.

About the film:

Bruce Willis and an all-star cast of roughneck oil drillers blast off on a mission to save the planet in Michael Bay’s doomsday space epic.

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Buy The Film On Amazon:

Armageddon_cover_small

Siskel & Ebert Review:


Episode Links:

Episode Credits:


Music from this episode is by Peter, Paul, & Mary and Aerosmith.

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Episode 171 – Vilgot Sjöman’s I Am Curious… https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-171-i-am-curious Wed, 30 Mar 2016 12:00:34 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=52444 curious_yellow_cover_large1b

This time on the podcast, Scott is joined by David Blakeslee and James McCormick to discuss Vilgot Sjöman’s I Am Curious (Yellow) and I Am Curious (Blue).

About the film:

Seized by customs upon entry to the United States, subject of a heated court battle, banned in cities across the United States, Vilgot Sjöman’s I Am Curious—Yellow is one of the most controversial films of all time. This landmark document of Swedish society during the sexual revolution has been declared both obscene and revolutionary. It tells the story of Lena (Lena Nyman), a searching and rebellious young woman, and her personal quest to understand the social and political conditions in 1960s Sweden, as well as her bold exploration of her own sexual identity. Shattering taboos as it freely traverses the lines between fact and fiction, I Am Curious—Yellow is presented here for the first time with its companion piece I Am Curious—Blue, a parallel film featuring the same characters and in which the lines between documentary and fiction are even further blurred.

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Buy The Film On Amazon:

Curious_cover_small

Watch Vilgot Sjöman’s introduction:


Episode Links:

Episode Credits:


Music from this episode is by Coldplay and Eiffel 65.

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Episode 170 – The Flowers of St. Francis https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-170-the-flowers-of-st-francis Mon, 08 Feb 2016 13:00:26 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=51909 flowers_header1a

This time on the podcast, Scott is joined by David Blakeslee to discuss Roberto Rossellini’s The Flowers of St. Francis.

About the film:

In a series of simple and joyous vignettes, director Roberto Rossellini and co-writer Federico Fellini lovingly convey the universal teachings of the People’s Saint: humility, compassion, faith, and sacrifice. Gorgeously photographed to evoke the medieval paintings of Saint Francis’s time, and cast with monks from the Nocera Inferiore Monastery, The Flowers of St. Francis is a timeless and moving portrait of the search for spiritual enlightenment.

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Buy The Film On Amazon:

Flowers_cover

Watch a scene from the film:


Episode Links:

Episode Credits:


Music from this episode is by Jackie DeShannon.

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Episode 169 – Criterion Collection Blu-ray Upgrade Wish List for 2016 https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-169-wish-list-for-2016 https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-169-wish-list-for-2016#comments Wed, 30 Dec 2015 13:00:13 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=51369 DVD Collage Final Header

This time on the podcast, Ryan is joined by Scott Nye, David Blakeslee, Mark Hurne and Trevor Berrett to present their Blu-ray upgrade wish lists for 2016.

Subscribe in iTunes or RSS.


Episode Links

Past Wish List Episodes

David’s list

Mark’s list

Ryan’s list:

Scott’s list

Trevor’s list

Episode Credits


Music for the show is from Fatboy Roberts’ Geek Remixed project.

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Episode 168 – Eric Rohmer’s My Night at Maud’s https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-168-eric-rohmers-my-night-at-mauds Mon, 28 Dec 2015 13:00:16 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=51350 maud_potemkine1a

This time on the podcast, Scott is joined by David Blakeslee to discuss Eric Rohmer’s My Night at Maud’s.

About the film:

In the brilliantly accomplished centerpiece of Rohmer’s “Moral Tales” series, Jean-Louis Trintignant plays Jean-Louis, one of the great conflicted figures of sixties cinema. A pious Catholic engineer in his early thirties, he lives by a strict moral code in order to rationalize his world, drowning himself in mathematics and the philosophy of Pascal. After spotting the delicate, blonde Françoise at Mass, he vows to make her his wife, although when he unwittingly spends the night at the apartment of the bold, brunette divorcée Maud, his rigid ethical standards are challenged. A breakout hit in the United States, My Night at Maud’s was one of the most influential and talked-about films of the decade.

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Buy The Film On Amazon:

SixMoralTales

 

Watch the trailer:


Episode Links:

Episode Credits:


Music from this episode is by She & Him and Meaghan Smith.

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Episode 167 – Criterion Collection Favorites of 2015 https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-167-criterion-collection-favorites-of-2015 Thu, 17 Dec 2015 00:00:09 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=51320

To celebrate the past year of Criterion Collection releases, Ryan is joined by David Blakeslee, Scott Nye, Aaron West, Arik Devens and Keith Enright to discuss their favorite releases of 2015.

Subscribe to the podcast via RSS or in iTunes

Corrections: In the episode, I should have had Aaron go before Arik, since I said I was going alphabetically.


EPISODE LINKS & NOTES

Favorite Covers

Favorite Supplement

  • Arik
    • 65 Revisited
  • Aaron
    • Un tournage a la campagne
  • David
    • Interview with Gregor Dorfmeister, author of The Bridge
  • Keith
    • Reflections on … My Beautiful Laundrette – Colin MacCabe and Stephen Frears
  • Ryan
    • Restoring the Apu Trilogy by kogonada
  • Scott
    • Interview with Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne on Two Days, One Night

Favorite Upgrades & Reissues

  • Arik
    • My Dinner With Andre
  • Aaron
    • Hiroshima Mon Amour / An Autumn Afternoon
  • David
    • The River
  • Keith
    • The River
  • Ryan
    • The River
  • Scott
    • Cries and Whispers

Favorite Release

  • Arik
    • The Apu Trilogy
  • Aaron
    • The Apu Trilogy
  • David
    • Limelight
  • Keith
    • In Cold Blood
  • Ryan
    • Watership Down
  • Scott
    • Every Man For Himself

Disappointments

  • Arik
    • Upgrades
  • Aaron
    • Jellyfish Eyes
  • David
    • Stagnation on the Hulu channel
  • Keith
    • Dressed to Kill, Mister Johnson & Every Man for Himself
  • Ryan
    • Box sets
  • Scott
    • Good enough?

EPISODE CREDITS


Music for the show is from Bobby Roberts’ Geek Remixed project. 

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Episode 166 – William Cameron Menzies’s Things to Come https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-166-things-to-come https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-166-things-to-come#comments Thu, 26 Nov 2015 06:00:13 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=51125 TTC_cover1b

This time on the podcast, Scott is joined by David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett to discuss William Cameron Menzies’ H.G. Wells’ Things to Come.

About the film:

A landmark collaboration between writer H. G. Wells, producer Alexander Korda, and designer and director William Cameron Menzies, Things to Come is a science fiction film like no other, a prescient political work that predicts a century of turmoil and progress. Skipping through time, Things to Come bears witness to world war, disease, dictatorship, and, finally, utopia. Conceived, written, and overseen by Wells himself as an adaptation of his own work, this megabudget production, the most ambitious ever from Korda’s London Films, is a triumph of imagination and technical audacity.

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Buy The Film On Amazon:

TTC_blu

TTC_dvd

Watch the trailer:


Episode Links:

Episode Credits:


Music from this episode is by Arthur Bliss.

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Episode 165 – Guillermo Del Toro’s The Devil’s Backbone https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-165-guillermo-del-toros-the-devils-backbone https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-165-guillermo-del-toros-the-devils-backbone#comments Fri, 30 Oct 2015 12:00:56 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=50864 Devil_header

This time on the podcast, Scott is joined by David Blakeslee and Ryan Gallagher to discuss Guillermo Del Toro’s The Devil’s Backbone.

About the film:

One of the most personal films by Guillermo del Toro, The Devil’s Backbone is also among his most frightening and emotionally layered. Set during the final week of the Spanish Civil War, it tells the tale of a twelve-year-old boy who, after his freedom-fighting father is killed, is sent to a haunted rural orphanage full of terrible secrets. Del Toro expertly combines gothic ghost story, murder mystery, and historical melodrama in a stylish mélange that, like his later Pan’s Labyrinth, reminds us the scariest monsters are often the human ones.

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Buy The Film On Amazon:

Devil_Blu

Devil_DVD

See Criterion’s Three Reasons:


Episode Links:

Episode Credits:


Music from this episode is by The White Stripes and The Clash.

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Episode 164 – Anthony Asquith’s The Importance of Being Earnest https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-164-the-importance-of-being-earnest Mon, 05 Oct 2015 12:00:33 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=50697 earnest-header

This time on the podcast, Scott is joined by David Blakeslee and Sean Hutchinson to discuss Anthony Asquith’s The Importance of Being Earnest.

About the film:

Oscar Wilde’s comic jewel sparkles in Anthony Asquith’s film adaptation of The Importance of Being Earnest. Featuring brilliantly polished performances by Michael Redgrave, Joan Greenwood, and Dame Edith Evans, the enduringly hilarious story of two young women who think themselves engaged to the same nonexistent man is given the grand Technicolor treatment. Seldom has a classic stage comedy been so engagingly transferred to the screen.

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Buy the film on Amazon:

earnest_cover

Watch a clip from the film:


Episode Links:

Episode Credits:


Music from this episode is by Benjamin Frankel.

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Episode 163 – Victor Erice’s The Spirit of the Beehive https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-163-victor-erices-the-spirit-of-the-beehive Mon, 14 Sep 2015 12:00:53 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=50496 beehive_cover1

This time on the podcast, Scott is joined by David Blakeslee, Trevor Berrett, and Ryan Gallagher to discuss Victor Erice’s The Spirit of the Beehive.

About the film:

Criterion is proud to present Víctor Erice’s spellbinding The Spirit of the Beehive (El espíritu de la colmena), widely regarded as the greatest Spanish film of the 1970s. In a small Castilian village in 1940, in the wake of the country’s devastating civil war, six-year-old Ana attends a traveling movie show of Frankenstein and becomes possessed by the memory of it. Produced as Franco’s long regime was nearing its end, The Spirit of the Beehive is a bewitching portrait of a child’s haunted inner life and one of the most visually arresting movies ever made.

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Music from this episode is by Luis de Pablo.

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Episode 162 – Krzysztof Kieślowski’s The Double Life of Véronique https://criterioncast.com/podcast/criterioncast-episodes/episode-162-krzysztof-kieslowskis-the-double-life-of-veronique Mon, 03 Aug 2015 12:00:31 +0000 http://criterioncast.com/?p=50165 image (1)

This time on the podcast, Scott is joined by David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett to discuss Krzysztof Kieślowski’s The Double Life of Véronique.

About the film:

Krzysztof Kieślowski’s international breakthrough remains one of his most beloved films, a ravishing, mysterious rumination on identity, love, and human intuition. Irène Jacob is incandescent as both Weronika, a Polish choir soprano, and her double, Véronique, a French music teacher. Though unknown to each other, the two women share an enigmatic, emotional bond, which Kieślowski details in gorgeous reflections, colors, and movements. Aided by Slawomir Idziak’s shimmering cinematography and Zbigniew Preisner’s haunting, operatic score, Kieślowski creates one of cinema’s most purely metaphysical works. The Double Life of Véronique is an unforgettable symphony of feeling.

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Buy The Film On Amazon:

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Watch the trailer:


Episode Links:

Episode Credits:


Music from this episode is by Zbigniew Preisner.

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