Episode 35 – David Cronenberg’s Naked Lunch

This is the podcast dedicated to The Criterion Collection. Rudie Obias, Ryan Gallagher & James McCormick discuss Criterion News & Rumors and Criterion New Releases, they also analyze, discuss & highlight CC #220, David Cronenberg’s 1991 film, Naked Lunch, along with ‘Variations On a Theme’.

This Week’s Variation on a Theme: Altered Reality in Movies

What do you think of their show? Please send them your feed back: [email protected] or call their voicemail line @ 347.878.3430 or follow them on twitter @CriterionCast or Comment on their blog, http://CriterionCast.com.

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They broadcast every episode LIVE on UStream every Friday @ 7pm EST/4pm PST. Join in on the conversation @ CriterionCast.com/LIVE

Our next episode they will highlight and discuss Criterion #288 Orson Welles’ 1975 film, F For Fake.

Add It To Your Netflix Queue & Also Available On Netflix Watch Instantly!.

Show Notes:

(00:00 – 00:30; David Cronenberg’s Naked Lunch – CC #220)

(00:31 – 00:47; “A United Theory” by God Help The Girl)

(00:48 – 01:34; The CriterionCast – Episode 035 – Naked Lunch – CC #220)

[NEWS & RUMORS]

(01:35 – 09:27; The Auteurs.com Rebrand Themselves As Mubi.com)

(09:28 – 13:54; Janus Films Acquires Distribution Rights To Charlie Chaplin Catalogue, Is A Criterion Boxed Set Inevitable?)

(13:55 – 18:15; Wacky Criterion Collection Newsletter Drawing Hints At Breathless Blu-ray Release)

(18:16 – 26:31; Criterion New Releases)

(26:32 – 27:42; Break Music by Carlos Segovia)

[FEATURE FILM]

(27:43 – 1:10:45; David Cronenberg’s 1991 film, Naked Lunch – CC #220)

(1:10:46 – 1:11:26; Break Music by Carlos Segovia)

[Variations On a Theme]

(1:11:27 – 1:12:27; Variations On a Theme – Altered Reality in Movies)

(1:12:28 – 1:19:39; Who Framed Roger Rabbit? – Ryan Gallagher)

(1:19:40 – 1:24:42; Memento – James McCormick)

(1:24:43 – 1:33:33; Star Trek (2009) – Rudie Obias)

[CREDITS]

(1:33:34 – 1:37:06; Wrap Up, Contact Info & Credits)

(1:37:07 – 1:38:11; Next – Orson Welles’ 1975 film, F For Fake)

(1:38:12 – 1:38:25; Follow Along With Us @ CriterionCast.com/Schedule)

(1:38:26 – 1:38:45; Goodbyes)

(1:38:46 – 1:39:28; “Working Poor” by Horse Feathers)

(1:39:29 – 1:40:41; Outtakes!!)

Music Credits:

Intro Music by God Help The Girl. Learn more on iTunes and their website, GodHelpTheGirl.com.

Break Music by Carlos Segovia. Learn more @ GhostRamps.com.

Outro Music by Horse Feathers. Learn more on iTunes and their MySpace Page, MySpace.com/HorseFeathersMusic.

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3 Comments

  • Thanks for the kind (and totally unsolicited!) mention of my blog in this episode. I just happened to be dropping in on the Ustream live broadcast of the show when I heard Rudie mention my blog but my feed was briefly interrupted and I didn't hear Ryan's comment until I listened to the iTunes replay just now. I want to respond to his comment that it's “unlikely” that I'll start over from the beginning and fill in all the back-dated DVDs that were released after I started my chronological series of reviews in January 2009 (e.g. the Joseph von Sternberg box, or Stagecoach, or Make Way for Tomorrow, or the Rossellini War Trilogy, or That Hamilton Woman, or the upcoming Ozu silents, etc.) Let me say here and now, officially, that my mind isn't made up yet but I'm certainly open to the idea! Of course I have several years of work ahead of me before I reach “the present day” (whenever that will be) so who knows where my life will be at that time, but if I end up with 600+ Criterion reviews written by then, I think it would be a shame if I didn't find some way to fill in the gaps and stay current with whatever else they choose to release. And of course, I will continue to watch and learn from the films that don't make it into my blog series because they precede my current point in time (as I already have.)

    Let me conclude here by saying that I just posted #136 today (Renoir's “French Cancan”) and my zeal hasn't flagged a bit since I started this project! But I probably won't be posting a new review for awhile – I have three discs and a full-length novel to get through for my upcoming post on Mr. Arkadin!

  • Thanks for the kind (and totally unsolicited!) mention of my blog in this episode. I just happened to be dropping in on the Ustream live broadcast of the show when I heard Rudie mention my blog but my feed was briefly interrupted and I didn't hear Ryan's comment until I listened to the iTunes replay just now. I want to respond to his comment that it's “unlikely” that I'll start over from the beginning and fill in all the back-dated DVDs that were released after I started my chronological series of reviews in January 2009 (e.g. the Joseph von Sternberg box, or Stagecoach, or Make Way for Tomorrow, or the Rossellini War Trilogy, or That Hamilton Woman, or the upcoming Ozu silents, etc.) Let me say here and now, officially, that my mind isn't made up yet but I'm certainly open to the idea! Of course I have several years of work ahead of me before I reach “the present day” (whenever that will be) so who knows where my life will be at that time, but if I end up with 600+ Criterion reviews written by then, I think it would be a shame if I didn't find some way to fill in the gaps and stay current with whatever else they choose to release. And of course, I will continue to watch and learn from the films that don't make it into my blog series because they precede my current point in time (as I already have.)

    Let me conclude here by saying that I just posted #136 today (Renoir's “French Cancan”) and my zeal hasn't flagged a bit since I started this project! But I probably won't be posting a new review for awhile – I have three discs and a full-length novel to get through for my upcoming post on Mr. Arkadin!

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