Episode 9 – Yasujiro Ozu’s Late Spring

This is the podcast dedicated to The Criterion Collection. Rudie, Ryan & Travis discuss Criterion News & Rumors, Criterion New Releases, they analyze, discuss & highlight CC #331, Yasujiro Ozu’s 1949 film, LATE SPRING, plus Criterion Trivia, and ‘Variations of a Theme’.

This week’s theme: Father/Daughter Relationships in Movies

Criterion Trivia Question for the month of October: ‘What was the name of the small town in New Mexico where Thomas Jerome Newton had fallen to earth in the Sci-Fi classic, Nicolas Roeg’s The Man Who Fell To Earth?”

Please send your answer to [email protected]. You have until October 31th 2009 to be eligible to win. Please include in your email, Your Name; Your Locaction; and Your Mailing Address. One winner will be selected out of all the correctly answered entries. The selection of October’s winner will take place during the first episode in November 2009. The winner will receive a $10 gift certificate for The Criterion Store (criterion.com) from The CriterionCast (us).

What do you think of our show? Is there a Criterion Film you would like us to review? Please send you’re feed back: [email protected] or call our voicemail line @ 347.878.3430 or follow us on twitter @CriterionCast or Comment on our blog http://criterioncast.com

Thank You! for listening. Don’t forget to subscribe to our podcast and please leave your reviews in our itunes feed.

Our next episode we will cover CC #410 John Huston’s UNDER THE VOLCANO.

ADD IT TO YOUR QUEUE!

Credits:

(00:00 – 00:15; “A United Theory” by God Help The Girl)
(00:16 – 01:36; The CriterionCast – Episode 009 – Late Spring CC #331)
(01:37 – 01:44; News & Rumors)
(01:45 – 12:20; How Much of the Fantastic Mr. Fox Did Wes Anderson Direct?)
(12:21 – 23:53; The Death of Blu-Ray Discs?)
(23:54 – 27:27; Gus Van Sant & Bret Easton Ellis Team Up)
(27:28 – 28:38; New Releases)
(28:39 – 34:51; Steven Soderbergh’s Che CC #496)
(34:52 – 40:08; Roberto Rossellini’s War Trilogy CC #500)
(40:09 – 43:43; Wim Wenders’ Paris, Texas CC #501)
(43:44 – 44:52; BREAK – Music by Carlos Segovia)
(44:53 – 1:11:24; Yasujiro Ozu’s Late Spring CC #331)
(1:11:25 – 1:12:25; BREAK – Music by Carlos Segovia)
(1:12:26 – 1:13:17; Trivia)
(1:13:18 – 1:31:01; Variations On a Theme – Father/Daughter Relationships in Movies)
(1:31:02 – 1:32:19; Contact Info & Credits)
(1:32:20 – 1:32:35; Next – Under The Volcano CC #410)
(1:32:36 – 1:32:41; Under The Volcano on NetFlix)
(1:32:42 – 1:34:26; Feed Change)
(1:34:27 – 1:34:40; Goodbyes)
(1:34:41 – 1:35:54; “Candy” by Ash)
(1:35:55 – 1:36:57; Outtakes!!)

Intro Music by God Help The Girl. Learn more on iTunes and their website, http://GodHelpTheGirl.com

Music during the breaks by Carlos Segovia. Learn more @ ghostramps.com

Outro Music by Ash. Learn more on iTunes.

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14 Comments

  • some other falher/daughter relationship movies just came to my mind: Clint Eastwood´s Million Dollar Baby, Howard Deutch´s Pretty in Pink and Lucía Puenzo´s XXY, Daniel Burman´s Empty Nest (El Nido Vacío)

  • some other falher/daughter relationship movies just came to my mind: Clint Eastwood´s Million Dollar Baby, Howard Deutch´s Pretty in Pink and Lucía Puenzo´s XXY, Daniel Burman´s Empty Nest (El Nido Vacío)

  • I just listened to your discussion about Criterion spine #500. I also harbor basic disagreement with their decision to put a # on the boxes, especially given their inconsistency. Why didn't the Rebel Samurai box get its own number? All four films were released simultaneously even though they were made available individually as well. And for Monsters & Madmen, we have double numbers on the same DVD case, but only one number each for The Killers and The Lower Depths, each featuring two separate (and Criterion-worthy) films in the same box. WHAT IS UP WITH THAT?!?!? And how about Magnificent Obsession, where we have two different feature films in the same set, but one is relegated to “supplementary” status. Consider me irked.

    And going back to #500, did you notice that they even changed their numbering scheme for that box? In all other cases, the box set # comes first, then the films get their individual #, but for the Rossellini set, they put the box # last. Blatant manipulation. If the actual achievement of restoring the War Trilogy and making them widely available for pretty much the first time ever wasn't so impressive in its own right, I might be somewhat disgusted with the whole thing.

  • Oh and another thing about the Howards End delayed DVD release, my impression is that Criterion at first had no plans to release it on DVD since adequate versions already exist – they just obtained rights for the Bluray release. But the fan base got stirred up over a missing spine # in the DVD series so Criterion acknowledged the demand and negotiated a new distribution deal. I think I read somewhere it's essentially the same “collector's edition” version that's already available, just in a Criterion package. A testament to the marketing power of the C.

  • I just listened to your discussion about Criterion spine #500. I also harbor basic disagreement with their decision to put a # on the boxes, especially given their inconsistency. Why didn't the Rebel Samurai box get its own number? All four films were released simultaneously even though they were made available individually as well. And for Monsters & Madmen, we have double numbers on the same DVD case, but only one number each for The Killers and The Lower Depths, each featuring two separate (and Criterion-worthy) films in the same box. WHAT IS UP WITH THAT?!?!? And how about Magnificent Obsession, where we have two different feature films in the same set, but one is relegated to “supplementary” status. Consider me irked.

    And going back to #500, did you notice that they even changed their numbering scheme for that box? In all other cases, the box set # comes first, then the films get their individual #, but for the Rossellini set, they put the box # last. Blatant manipulation. If the actual achievement of restoring the War Trilogy and making them widely available for pretty much the first time ever wasn't so impressive in its own right, I might be somewhat disgusted with the whole thing.

  • Oh and another thing about the Howards End delayed DVD release, my impression is that Criterion at first had no plans to release it on DVD since adequate versions already exist – they just obtained rights for the Bluray release. But the fan base got stirred up over a missing spine # in the DVD series so Criterion acknowledged the demand and negotiated a new distribution deal. I think I read somewhere it's essentially the same “collector's edition” version that's already available, just in a Criterion package. A testament to the marketing power of the C.

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