Film Society of Lincoln Center Announces Edgar G. Ulmer Series

People on Sunday header

Though not as high-profile as his fellow Austrian/German film pioneers Billy Wilder, Fred Zinnemann, or F.W. Murnau, filmmaker Edgar G. Ulmer (People On Sunday) still created an eclectic body of work that ranged from early documentary masterpieces, to stylish film noir classics, to far out cautionary sci-fi tales.

A series of his films—titled “Edgar G. Ulmer: Back from the Margins”—and a documentary about him will screen at the Film Society of Lincoln Center from January 10th through the 18th. The series is presented in collaboration with Noah Isenberg, the director of Screen Studies at the New School and author of the new book Edgar G. Ulmer: A Filmmaker at the Margins. Screenings will also include appearances by Isenberg; Ulmer’s daughter Arianne; and Sharon Pucker Rivo, co-founder and Executive Director of National Center for Jewish Film.

The series includes the following titles and showtimes:

Beyond the Time Barrier

Edward G. Ulmer | 1960 | 75 mins

Friday, January 17

7:30pm

Edgar G. Ulmer: The Man Off-Screen

Michael Palm | 2004 | 77 mins

Friday, January 10

4:15pm

Friday, January 17

3:10pm

 

The Light Ahead (Fishke the Lame)

Edgar G. Ulmer | 1939 | 94 mins

Friday, January 10

6:30pm

Friday, January 17

1:00pm

Murder Is My Beat

Edgar G.Ulmer | 1955 | 77 mins

Saturday, January 11

4:00pm

Friday, January 17

9:45pm

The Naked Dawn

Edgar G. Ulmer | 1955 | 82 mins

Friday, January 10

9:00pm

Saturday, January 18

1:00pm

People on Sunday

Robert Siodmak & Edgar G. Ulmer | 1930 | 73 mins

Friday, January 17

5:15pm

Ruthless

Edgar G. Ulmer | 1948 | 104 mins

Saturday, January 11

1:15pm

Saturday, January 18

3:30pm

I’m definitely not an expert on Ulmer, but his lone contribution to the Collection, People on Sunday, with co-director Robert Siodmak, has remained one of my favorite unsung releases ever since Criterion put it out in 2011 as both a cinematic precursor to modern documentary techniques as well as an important historical example of Weimar Germany. Though the titles in the series don’t delve deeper into the particular genre of People on Sunday, the remaining films run the gamut enough to make me interested in checking out more from this near-forgotten filmmaker. Plus, any movie with a title like Murder is My Beat has to be at least a little interesting.

For more information on the series or to buy tickets, click here.

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