Episode 25.5 – Disc 2 – On the Screen – Cynical Lost Fans – IFC / Criterion Discussion [Podcast]

You are listening to The Criterion Cast: Disc 2 – Episode 025.5

Disc 2 episodes are bonus/supplement episodes of The CriterionCast. Rudie, Ryan and Travis ramble on and on about movies and movie experiences. In a new segment, ‘On The Screen’, this is where they discuss anything and everything that has been on their screens in the week. So anything from TV & movies to music & web junk, everything ‘On The Screen’ is up for grabs. This is what they recommend to you, the listeners.

Topic of Discussion:

Does IFC fit with The Criterion Collection?

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We broadcast every episode LIVE on UStream every Friday @ 7pm EST/4pm PST. Join in on the conversation @ CriterionCast.com/LIVE

Our next episode we will highlight and discuss Criterion #157 Wes Anderson’s The Royal Tenenbaums.

Add It To Your Netflix Queue (Also Available Through Netflix Watch Instantly)

Show Notes:

(00:00 – 00:10; “Rush Apart” by The Rural Alberta Advantage)

(00:11 – 00:49; The CriterionCast – Episode 025.5 – Disc 2)

(00:50 – 09:04; Eagle Vs Shark – Travis George)

Order Eagle vs. Shark on Amazon

 

(09:05 – 14:57; Alone In The Wilderness – Travis George)

Order Alone in the Wilderness on Amazon

 

(14:58 – 17:14; Reservoir Dogs – Rudie Obias)

Order Reservoir Dogs on Amazon

 

(17:15 – 17:55; Hunger – Rudie Obias)

Order Hunger on Amazon

 

(17:56 – 29:56; LOST – Ryan Gallagher)

(29:57 – 33:14; Cloverfield – Ryan Gallagher)

Order Cloverfield on Amazon

 

(33:15 – 34:56; Travis George Wants To Watch Cobra Now!!)

Order Cobra on Amazon

(34:57 – 41:01; Sunshine – Ryan Gallagher)

Order Sunshine on Amazon

 

(41:02 – 56:40; Does IFC fit with The Criterion Collection?)

(56:41 – 58:14; Wrap Up & Contact Info)

(58:15 – 58:27; Music Credits)

(58:28 – 58:39; Broadcasting Live Every Friday On UStream)

(58:40 – 58:54; Next – Wes Anderson’s The Royal Tenenbaums – CC #157)

(58:55 – 59:09; Follow Along With Us @ CriterionCast.com/Schedule)

(59:10 – 59:27; Goodbyes)

(59:28 – 1:00:37; “Sperm & Egg” by Flotation Walls)

(1:00:38 – 1:01:34; Outtakes!!)

Also Mentioned: Defying Gravity – WATCH IT!!

Music Credits:

Opening Music:

“Rush Apart” by The Rural Alberta Advantage. Learn more @ TheRAA.com

Closing Music:

“Sperm & Egg” by Flotation Walls. Learn more @ FlotationWalls.com

2 Comments

  • Like Rudie, I also enjoyed the discussion of the IFC/Criterion partnership. I initially had some reservations about their arrangement, wondering if IFC would end up flooding the collection with a bunch of mediocre titles or otherwise exploiting the Criterion brand. I haven't seen any indication of that based on what I've read about these newer films – that Newsweek article that took CC to task, “The Curious Case of the Instant Classic”, actually moved me toward supporting Criterion, because the writer showed such a poor, naive grasp of what CC is about or their long history of releasing odd, non-canonical but noteworthy films. The 2-disc Armageddon was highly innovative at the time, as was the Beastie Boys comp, which demonstrated the possibilities of the DVD format with its multi-angle features, etc. It's so easy for novices and would-be snobs to give Criterion crap for those and other releases while completely missing the point of what made them worthwhile at the time. That refusal to be too tightly bound to preexisting notions is one of the things I like most about Criterion as a media publisher.

    At this point, I trust their judgment and I'm pleased with this expansion and embrace of newer, fresher films. Kind of ironic since my blogging project has me focused on older films right now, but that will change eventually! This quote from last September's press release announcing the IFC/Criterion partnership indicates a shared perspective, and it makes as much sense to me as Criterion's collaboration with Rialto and (alas) StudioCanal in years past:

    “From the inception of IFC Films, we modeled our acquisition strategy on Criterion’s but with the intent on focusing on the auteurs of today,” said Jonathan Sehring, IFC Films’ President of IFC Entertainment. “It’s a great honor and thrill for us to embark on this partnership with them. They are the golden seal of approval.”

    Peter Becker from Criterion commented, “IFC Films has been on an incredible roll, hunting down daring international films and spotting filmmakers whose work will stand the test of time. Criterion has always presented a mix of international classics and director-approved editions of important contemporary films, so this new slate of releases fits our mission perfectly. These films are future classics, and we’re very excited about the opportunity to work with the filmmakers to present them in great editions right from the start.”

    Here's a link to that release, which also names quite a few other interesting releases presumably scheduled for later this year:

    http://www.ifcfilms.com/inside-ifc-films/ifc-fi

  • Like Rudie, I also enjoyed the discussion of the IFC/Criterion partnership. I initially had some reservations about their arrangement, wondering if IFC would end up flooding the collection with a bunch of mediocre titles or otherwise exploiting the Criterion brand. I haven't seen any indication of that based on what I've read about these newer films – that Newsweek article that took CC to task, “The Curious Case of the Instant Classic”, actually moved me toward supporting Criterion, because the writer showed such a poor, naive grasp of what CC is about or their long history of releasing odd, non-canonical but noteworthy films. The 2-disc Armageddon was highly innovative at the time, as was the Beastie Boys comp, which demonstrated the possibilities of the DVD format with its multi-angle features, etc. It's so easy for novices and would-be snobs to give Criterion crap for those and other releases while completely missing the point of what made them worthwhile at the time. That refusal to be too tightly bound to preexisting notions is one of the things I like most about Criterion as a media publisher.

    At this point, I trust their judgment and I'm pleased with this expansion and embrace of newer, fresher films. Kind of ironic since my blogging project has me focused on older films right now, but that will change eventually! This quote from last September's press release announcing the IFC/Criterion partnership indicates a shared perspective, and it makes as much sense to me as Criterion's collaboration with Rialto and (alas) StudioCanal in years past:

    “From the inception of IFC Films, we modeled our acquisition strategy on Criterion’s but with the intent on focusing on the auteurs of today,” said Jonathan Sehring, IFC Films’ President of IFC Entertainment. “It’s a great honor and thrill for us to embark on this partnership with them. They are the golden seal of approval.”

    Peter Becker from Criterion commented, “IFC Films has been on an incredible roll, hunting down daring international films and spotting filmmakers whose work will stand the test of time. Criterion has always presented a mix of international classics and director-approved editions of important contemporary films, so this new slate of releases fits our mission perfectly. These films are future classics, and we’re very excited about the opportunity to work with the filmmakers to present them in great editions right from the start.”

    Here's a link to that release, which also names quite a few other interesting releases presumably scheduled for later this year:

    http://www.ifcfilms.com/inside-ifc-films/ifc-fi

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